Wisconsin Drain Campaign May 31-June 2

Draining livewells can stop invasive species and protect Wisconsin’s Waters

MADISON- Fishing success is tied to healthy lakes, rivers and streams. Anglers can help keep our waters healthy and beautiful by stopping the spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS) by draining their live wells, bait buckets and bilges every time they leave a boat launch or fishing access. When we forget to drain, the water moved from one location to another can transport fish diseases and aquatic invasive species. The statewide Drain Campaign, our annual reminder, will take place on May 31-June 2, 2019 and coincides with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Free Fishing Weekend, June 1-2.

Clean Boats, Clean Waters boat inspectors made up of volunteers, regional aquatic invasive species partners and WDNR staff will talk with anglers and boaters at launches around the state. At many lakes and river accesses, they will also hand out free ice packs and other Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers! Items while they remind people that icing is the best way to keep fish fresh.

“Ice is the preferred way to transport your catch”, says Samantha Lammers, Glacierland RC&D’s Invasive Species Coordinator for Sheboygan and Manitowoc Counties, adding that ice also helps to preserve flavor of your fish as well as stops bacterial growth on the trip home. “Draining livewells, bait buckets, motors, and bilges help keep diseases and invasive species, even ones we cannot see, from moving between our waterbodies. Other ways to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species include removing all vegetation from trailers and boats after a day on the water, allowing boats and other equipment to dry for 5 days, or using a form of decontamination like steam, or a 10% bleach solution.”

Individuals who love to fish and are passionate about natural resource protection are the best messengers to spread the word to other anglers by modeling these prevention steps to those new to the sport as well as to others who don’t know the law and reasons behind it. Those who use social media can also spread the word about the importance of draining livewells and other equipment by posting photos and using #JustDrainIt.

The following steps are required by law to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species in Wisconsin:

  • INSPECT boats, trailers, and equipment for attached aquatic vegetation, animals, or invertebrates.
  • REMOVE all attached aquatic vegetation, animals, or invertebrates.
  • DRAIN all water from boats, vehicles, and equipment, including livewells, and any container that contains fish.
  • NEVER MOVE vegetation or live fish away from any waterbody.
  • DISPOSE of unwanted bait in the trash.
  • BUY minnows from a Wisconsin bait dealer.
  • Only use leftover minnows when either 1) fishing with them on the same waterbody or 2) on other waters if no lake/river water or other fish have been added to the container.

To learn more about invasive species and their impact to Wisconsin’s waters and economy, visit http://dnr.wi.gov/lakes/invasives

Glacierland RC&D is a nonprofit, grass-roots organization that is committed to wise use and conservation of our natural resources and human resources. We promote sustainability on all levels – environmental, social and economic – by bringing together agencies, organizations and people to work on projects addressing issues of sustainability in Wisconsin.  For more information about Glacierland, visit our website at: www.glacierlandrcd.org/

Updated: May 21, 2019 — 7:12 pm

April 25 Meeting Focuses on Property Value Study, Lake Levels and AIS Coordinator

The cost of poor water quality to property values, an analysis commissioned by Manitowoc County Lakes Association, and conducted by Drs. Wolf and Kemp of UW-Eau Claire, will be presented by MCLA past president John Durbrow. The study, which analyzed 8,372 property transactions between 2013 and 2016 in Manitowoc and adjacent counties, has demonstrated that lake water clarity directly impacts the property value of residences on that water body. The report concludes “…that a 1 meter increase in water clarity will result in a 10.5% increase in home values for properties located within 250 meters of a lake.” Conversely, the more water clarity is degraded, the more property values are reduced. Read more

Updated: May 21, 2019 — 7:06 pm

DNR Conservation Warden Kuhn to speak on Feb 21

BOATING ORDINANCES
February 21, 2019
Manitowoc County Office Building
4319 Expo Dr, Rm 300, at 6:30pm. 

Our guest speaker will be Darren Kuhn, DNR Conservation Warden. He will be addressing legal issues, explain the boating ordinance process and getting State approval to boating ordinances. He will take questions regarding creating local boating ordinances, specifically to deal with mirrors on ski boats, and PFD use. Read more

Updated: February 26, 2019 — 1:18 pm

Cleaner County Waters Could Be Worth $30,840,000

Poor water clarity is costing Manitowoc County property owners money. An assessment commissioned by Manitowoc County Lakes Association, conducted by Drs. Wolf and Kemp of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, and supported by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, has demonstrated that lake water clarity directly impacts the property value of residences on that water body. The report concludes:

“… that a 1 meter increase in water clarity will result in a 10.5% increase in home values for properties located within 250 meters of a lake.”

Conversely, the more water clarity is degraded, the more property values are reduced. A hypothetical one meter increase in water clarity would add $30,840,000 to property values of residences associated with the Manitowoc County lakes.

Read more

Updated: May 2, 2019 — 9:36 pm

Ted Rulseh to Speak at Dec. 6 MCLA Meeting

Next MCLA Meeting Date: Thursday, Dec. 6, 2018

Manitowoc County Office Complex, Room 300
4319 Expo Drive, Manitowoc
Meetings are at 6:30pm — Public and guests welcome and encouraged to attend!

Our guest speaker will be Ted Rulseh, a former resident of Manitowoc County and author, editor and publisher of several books on the Great Lakes region, he is the author of On the Pond: Lake Michigan Reflections. He recently released a book called Lakeside Companion which presents the science of lakes in an enjoyable way, with real world examples. He explains how little things that shore residents do on their property can have a large impact on the lake’s ecology. Ted J. Rulseh writes the newspaper column “The Lake Where You Live” and is active in lake-advocacy organizations, including the Wisconsin Citizen Lake Monitoring Network. He lives in the lake-rich region of northeastern Wisconsin.

Following the program Gene Weyer will review the lake monitoring data for each lake in the MCLA monitoring program. We now have enough data to start to identify long term water quality trends in our lakes.

Updated: December 10, 2018 — 7:39 pm

Annual Awards Banquet Held Oct 12

by Hanna Edelglass

The Manitowoc County Lakes Association hosted its 20th annual Banquet this October 12th at Gill’s in Whitelaw.

Our Guest Speaker was Jim Knickelbine on “Birds of Our Waters” — view his presentation here.

Before an appreciative attendance, President Tom Ward welcomed attendees. He thanked Chuck Kiehn of Long Lake for arranging the banquet, and the Long Lake Association for sponsoring the dinner.  Tom expressed our appreciation of all who helped with the Fair Booth in August: Marcia Salm and her granddaughters, as well as Hanna Edelglass, Dave Pozorski, Jerry Corfman, Beth Kohlman, Chuck Kiehn, Scott Haberman and Al Klingheisen.

Six Lake Stewardship Awards were presented, reflecting achievements of the MCLA and its members.

 

4 people smiling and holding commemorative plaques

MCLA Awards recipients for 2018, left to right, are:
Eugene Weyer, June and Frank Scharenbroch, and Tom Ward.

Read more

Updated: May 2, 2019 — 9:04 pm

Birds of Our Waters Presentation

 

Our Guest Speaker for the October 12th MCLA banquet was Jim Knickelbine; Naturalist, Writer, and Director of Woodland Dunes Nature Center.

Jim is an experienced birder with years of experience observing and writing about the natural world. At the banquet, Jim shared his knowledge about our migratory feathered friends that inhabit and visit our county lakes and wetlands.

Read a summary of this presentation by Hanna Edelglass

Download a PowerPoint Show of the Birds of our Waters Presentation (9MB)

 

Updated: February 26, 2019 — 1:19 pm