Wilke Lake Comprehensive Management Plan

 

a lake with trees

 

Wilke Lake Sanitary District recently had Stantec Consulting Services Inc.
complete a Comprehensive Lake Management Plan.
The plan is available below. Any questions may be directed to Scott Umland at mcla.email@gmail.com.

Wilke_Lake_Management_Plan.pdf

Wilke Lake Comprehensive Lake Management Plan
Sponsored by: Town of Schleswig Sanitary District 2
WDNR Grant Program, Grant # LPL174620

Drafted by Stantec Consulting Services Inc.
12075 N. Corporate Parkway, Mequon, Wisconsin 53092

 


Wilke Lake,  a shallow 93-acre ground-water seepage lake located in southwestern Manitowoc County, is one of the most heavily used lakes in Manitowoc County for recreation by the public.

Wilke Lake suffers from the effects of human activities. Land use changes from presettlement conifer-hardwood forest to agriculture has increased nutrient and sediment loads. The lake is experiencing excessive submerged aquatic plant growth. Most macrophyte growth is Chara and the non-native plant species, Eurasian water-milfoil with some Curly leaf pondweed.

During the early 1960s, Wilke Lake began managing aquatic plants. During the 1970s, aquatic plants were not managed, and aquatic plant growth was excessive and late-summer boat traffic was severely restricted. During 1980, the Town of Schleswig Sanitary District 2 (more commonly known as the “Wilke Lake Sanitary District” [WLSD]) was formed with the authority to control and manage aquatic plants.

The WLSD has maintained an aquatic plant management plan since 1981. This revised Wilke Lake Comprehensive Management Plan (“the Plan”) is being developed to build on previous plans and studies, to recommend on-the-ground conservation measures within the watershed and provide a framework to implement these measures.

Public engagement and integration of stakeholder input was a priority throughout the development of the Plan. Respondents of a 2020 Survey overwhelmingly ranked water quality concerns (poor water quality and agricultural runoff) and aquatic plants as most important and feel this is where resources should be devoted.

Updated: June 4, 2021 — 8:14 am

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